Edinburgh Seismic Research

People

ESR currently has around 10 permanent researchers, 10 postdoctoral fellows and 25 PhD students.

Photo Mark Chapman is a Senior Research Geophysicist at The Edinburgh Anisotropy Project (EAP) in the British Geological Survey. Coming from a mathematical background, Mark received a PhD in Geophysics from The University of Edinburgh in 2001. He maintains a strong research interest in developing theoretical models to describe the elastic properties of fluid-saturated, fractured rock. His recent research involves the inversion of frequency-dependent seismic attributes in terms of fluid saturation, as well as fracture scale lengths and connectivities.
Photo Andrew Curtis is the Professor of Mathematical Geoscience at the University of Edinburgh. He worked in the Exploration industry for 8 years in the research laboratories of Schlumberger - a leading oilfield service company - before joining the University in 2004. His technical expertise spans subsurface monitoring, imaging and inversion, survey and experimental design, and seismic interferometry, and he is editor of two international journals - Petroleum Geoscience and Geophysical Journal International. Andrew is the current Director of Edinburgh Seismic Research.
Photo Hengchang Dai is a Senior Research Geophysicist at The Edinburgh Anisotropy Project (EAP) in the British Geological Survey. He received a PhD in Geophysics from Edinburgh University in 1996. His technical expertises spans PS converted wave theory and imaging, multi-component seismic data processing, parallel processing in PC cluster, GUI programming for parameter estimation. Neural network application. He developed a processing package (CXtools) for multi-component seismic processing.
Photo Xiang-Yang Li is the Director of The Edinburgh Anisotropy Project (EAP) in the British Geological Survey, and the Prof. of Multicomponent Seismology at the University of Edinburgh. His technical expertise spans anisotropic seismic analysis, fracture characterisation, rock and fluid properties, and multi-component seismics.
Photo Colin MacBeth is the Professor of Reservoir Geophysics at Heriot-Watt University. Prior to this he was Director of The Edinburgh Anisotropy Project (EAP) at the British Geological Survey, and is currently Director of The Edinburgh Time-Lapse Consortium (ETLP) at Heriot-Watt University. His technical expertise spans quantitative 4D seismic analysis, fracture characterisation, rock and fluid properties, and multi-component seismics.
Ian Main Ian Main is Professor of Seismology and Rock Physics at the University of Edinburgh. He is director of The Edinburgh Collaborative in Subsurface Science and Engineering (ECOSSE), and on the board of the Edinburgh Regional Partnership in Engineering and Mathematics. His research includes earthquake mechanics (including passive seismics), fracturing and faulting, fluid-rock interactions, and coupled effects of changes in stress, pore pressure and chemistry on the evolution of fracturing, subsurface fluid flow and wave propagation.
Photo Ingo Pecher joined Heriot-Watt University as an ECOSSE Geoscience Lecturer in 2006. He received a Diplom (MSc) in Geophysics in 1991 followed by a PhD in Natural Sciences, both from the University of Kiel, Germany. After post-doctoral studies at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA (1995-1998), an appointment as Research Associate at the University of Texas at Austin (1998-2001), he was Scientist, then Senior Scientist at GNS Science in Lower Hutt, New Zealand (2001-2006).
Photo Malcolm Rider is an Honorary Fellow of Edinburgh University. He has spent over 30 years in the oil industry, initially with the Total Group in France but mostly heading his own consulting company, Rider-French. He is the author of the ‘The Geological Interpretation of Well Logs’ and is known for his courses on the same subject given to the industry world-wide. His interest is in well logging, especially the modern image logs, in the service of geology and is associated with research in this area.
Photo Roger Scrutton is Reader of Marine and Applied Geophysics at Edinburgh University. His research is broadly on the application of geophysics to the solution of geological problems, and includes the interpretation of seismic exploration data over a very wide range of scales and environments. He is President of The British Geophysical Association.
Photo John Underhill holds the Chair of Stratigraphy in the School of Geosciences. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and an AAPG Distinguished Lecturer. He holds a BSc in Geology from Bristol University and a PhD from the University of Wales. He worked for Shell International for five years before joining The University of Edinburgh. He was the recipient of the Geological Society's prestigious President's Award in 1990 and their Wollaston Fund in 2000.